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Old 05-16-2011, 05:03 PM
hassan hassan is offline
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Default confusion regarding al-masdar & al-masdar al-mu'awwal

assalamu alaikum,
my question is about al-masdar & al-masdar al-mu'awwal (المصدر المؤول).

as per my understanding:
masdar is of two types:
  1. infinitive
  2. gerund
we can change both of these types into al-masdar al-mu'awwal. and the format for al-masdar al-mu'awwal is أنْ + فعل مضارع منصوب
for example, we can change خروجٌ into al-masdar al-mu'awwal i.e. أنْ أخرجَ .

my question here, is خروجٌ infinitive or gerund?
and what is its sign of being infinitive or gerund?
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Old 05-16-2011, 10:31 PM
irf2k irf2k is offline
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Wa'alaykum 'Asallam Wa Rahmatullahi Wa Barakatuh,

This is the difference between the infinitive and gerund in the English Language:
1. Gerund: He likes eating.
2. Infinitive: He likes to eat.

Definition of masdar in Arabic: (gr) the basic form of the verb from which all other forms are derived. example kitabatun (writing).
I take it as being the name of the action which in English we would equate to gerund.
example: يُحِبُّ أَكْلاً. He likes eating.

In Arabic there is nothing like infinitive (to eat). Arabic would use masdar or masdar muawal.

Definition of masdar muawal: a phrase which functions as a masdar.

When you use masdar muawal you would literally be saying (This is my way of comprehending the difference between masdar and masdar muawal):
example: يُحِبُّ أَنْ يَأْكُلَ. (literally: He likes that he eats.) He likes eating. Because in English there is such a thing as infinitive one may translate as: He likes to eat.

Answering you question: خروجٌ is masdar = gerund.
I hope I did rely to your question.
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Old 05-16-2011, 11:22 PM
hassan hassan is offline
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assalamu alaikum.
O thanks God you didnt say that gerund is masdar and infinitive is masdar al-mu'awwal. actually this is what my confusion was.
so the conclusion is this that:
masdar contains the essence of both infinitive and gerund in it. and masdar al-mu'awwal is an another thing, which functions as a masdar.

actually you know brother... if you see in your first example, the translation of masdar seems like gerund. and in the second one, the translation of masdar al-mu'awwal seems like infinitive. right?
so the translation was the "masdar" of my confusion

but bro, now its crystal clear to me. thanks alot

Last edited by hassan; 05-16-2011 at 11:33 PM.
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  #4  
Old 05-17-2011, 01:02 AM
irf2k irf2k is offline
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Yes.
The second translation seems like infinitive. That is because in English there is infinitive and I chose to use it (free translation) because the meaning is same for gerund and infinitive.
In Arabic with masdar and masdar muawal, the meaning is exactly the same: He likes eating.
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